Sequencing every newborn’s genome to detect diseases faces ethical and practical obstacles, but the United Kingdom is pushing ahead with a major test

Science |
September 2021
Press

Genomic testing for Baby Cora, a participant of The BabySeq Project, revealed a disorder that might otherwise have gone undetected through traditional newborn screening. “Cora’s case illustrates the promise of sequencing the entire genomes of newborns: uncovering a bounty of genetic information that could identify infants needing treatment and improve health later in life…Genomics England … Continued

Study finds genomic sequencing of healthy newborns does not disrupt family dynamics

EurekAlert |
August 2021
Press, Press Release

“We have now shown that this information can be medically beneficial through early intervention and is not disruptive to the parent-infant relationship, and our ongoing analysis is measuring economic effects of genome sequencing. This type of research is critical to determine best practices for preventive genomic healthcare throughout the lifespan.” – Robert Green

Green receives NIH research grant for BabySeq2

Brigham Publications: Awards, Honors & Grants |
August 2021
Press

“Robert Green, MD, MPH, of the Division of Genetics, received a research grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to fund The BabySeq Project: Phase II, also known as BabySeq2, the continuation of a project to study genome sequencing in newborns.”

G2P Newsletter July 2021

July 2021
G2P News

Our G2P research team continues to be extraordinarily productive, publishing 21 scientific papers so far this year. This summer newsletter highlights a few of these papers, as well as G2P media features, blog posts, and policy recommendations.

Robert Green: Newborn sequencing is the goal here in the U.S.

Mendelspod |
July 2021
Podcast

“If you go to a scientific meeting, even with the greatest critics, and you ask, how many people in this audience believe that your entire genome will be part of your everyday medical care in fifty years, every person will raise their hand. So the only questions we’re debating are: how do we get there, … Continued

Genomic sequencing to screen newborns raises more false alarms than routine blood tests

STAT |
August 2020
Press

In this study led by UCSF researchers, exome sequencing was found to produce more false positives and false negatives for inherited metabolic disorders than the standard blood testing conducted in newborns. G2P’s Dr. Robert Green, co-leader of the BabySeq Project, speaks to the possibility “that the most comprehensive screening for newborns will be some combination … Continued

23 and baby

Nature |
December 2019
Press

We now have the ability to screen for thousands of genetic diseases in newborns. That may not always be the healthy thing to do.

The promises and pitfalls of gene sequencing for newborns

NPR |
July 2019
Press

A decade ago, it seemed inevitable that every newborn would get a complete gene scan. But there are technical challenges and practical concerns.Dr. Robert Green, from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, voiced one view about doing that: “If sequencing reveals health risks at any point in life, and if that’s good, then it’s better … Continued

G2P Newsletter June 2019

June 2019
G2P News

G2P’s summer began with our team members participating in the Boston Athletic Association 10K on Sunday June 23rd! Over the past few months, G2P faculty have attended numerous conferences nationwide, been featured in podcasts discussing the new preventive genomics clinic, and engaged with leaders in science, business, and industry in support of the Franca Fund.

DNA testing could save young lives through early intervention

The Harvard Gazette |
March 2019
Press

Pediatric oncologist Dr. Lisa Diller, the Lillian Gollay Knafel Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, is exploring genetic testing in newborns that could help them escape severe health consequences.

G2P Newsletter March 2019

March 2019
G2P News

Spring saw accomplishments by team members through numerous projects. G2P officially kicked-off the PeopleSeq consortium in Boston this January! Our very own, Carrie Blout, MS, CGC, was one of 86 Partner’s individuals awarded the Partners In Excellence Award.

Is it too soon to consider genome sequencing for newborns?

Medium |
March 2019
G2P Blog

Parents and clinicians have their own ideas about newborn genome sequencing. Dr. Robert Green, principal investigator of the BabySeq Project, shares a detailed analysis of the results from the study and his thoughts on the utility of genomic sequencing for newborns in clinical care.

Genetically sequencing healthy babies yielded surprising results

Leapsmag |
January 2019
Press

As principal investigator on the BabySeq Project, Dr. Robert Green shares the findings from the project along with discussion on the expectations and benefits of sequencing healthy babies. Green states, “Suddenly the information available in the genome of even an apparently healthy individual is looking more robust, and the prospect of preventive genomics is looking … Continued

Baby sequencing steps

Nature Reviews Genetics |
January 2019
Press

In the BabySeq Study, a total of 88% of sequenced neonates had carrier status for one or more rare genetic variants known to be associated with recessive diseases.

Newborn genomic sequencing detects unanticipated disease risk factors

Brigham Women's Hospital |
January 2019
Press Release

Press Brief: The BabySeq project reports that out of the 159 newborns that were randomized to receive genomic sequencing, 15 were found to have a genetic variant for which there was a strong evidence of increased risk of a disorder that presents or is clinically manageable during childhood.

More than 10% of healthy people have monogenic risk variants

RareDR |
December 2018
Press

Robert Green, MD, MPH, the projects’ principal investigator suggests “These results are unexpected and exciting, suggesting that if we examine enough well-established, disease-associated genes, we will unearth monogenic risk variants in more than 10 percent of purportedly healthy individuals.”